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Best Red Wine for Cooking to Enhance Flavour

Red wine is used in a variety of dishes to help marinate food and give it a juicier, more flavourful taste. You might never have cooked with wine before or may have no idea why one wine would be preferable to another in certain dishes.

For each kind of dish that when is used for, there is a specific type of wine or a few kinds of wines that work best. That may be because they offer the most complimentary flavour profiles or help bring out the flavour better in that particular dish.

At one point, all of this was new to me, and I did not know what was the best dry red wine for cooking or when to use a white wine or a red wine in my cooking.

That’s why I want to share this information with you so that you can cook with some freedom and some knowledge, not needing to be bound to a recipe every time and being better able to choose your own ingredients. Knowing this stuff allows you to substitute various ingredients and make different choices when you cook the same meal more than once.

Why Use Red Wine?

There are a number of reasons to use red wine in your cooking. It’s often great for making a glaze or a marinade, and it can be a good way to tenderise the meat. In a lot of dishes, the alcohol will evaporate when the red wine is cooked, so there won’t be much of it left in the food.

At 172 degrees Fahrenheit, alcohol evaporates from the food, so boiling or even simmering your food will get rid of the alcohol content. You will just be left with the flavour of the red wine and not have to worry about the family getting drunk on the marinated beef tips.

Wine gives your food some acidity, and that helps with braising and other slow cooking methods so that your food doesn’t lose moisture and stays tender. Some dishes will absorb the colour from the wine, creating a purple stain and giving the food a tangy note of flavour.

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If you want your food to be more succulent and have a complex flavour profile, you might want to think about introducing some red wine into your cooking process. It can be added to sauces and even used in the place of oil in some kinds of cooking methods.

The Best Red Wine for Cooking Beef

One of the things you have to watch out for when cooking with red wine is that you may pass on some the characteristics of the wine onto the food. In some instances, that is preferable and desirable and in others it is not. The best red wine for cooking beef roast is going to be a dry one and not a sweet one.

You don’t want to make the mistake of making your food too sweet, so be careful about which wines you pick. They aren’t all going to give you the same results.

The best red wine for cooking beef stew is either a pinot, cabernet, or merlot because of their dryness. You don’t want to end up with a sweet stew. These are also among the best red wine for cooking roast beef and any other beef dish.

If you want to know whether you are using the right wine or if the wine you have on hand is suitable for your dish, just Google it to see if it is dry or sweet. You can also check the bottle and see what it says about the characteristic of the wine.

Using wine with your beef helps it to come out tender, and you can either soak the beef in the wine as a marinade or cook the beef in the wine. As the beef cooks, it will absorb the flavour of the wine, even as the alcohol is evaporated out. That leaves you with a non-alcoholic dish that is flavourful and juicy.

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The Best Red Wine for Cooking Spaghetti Sauce

What if you are making spaghetti sauce on your own, using fresh tomatoes and herbs and spices? You can use a red wine for that, but what red wine is best for cooking homemade spaghetti sauce?

Typically, spaghetti sauce will be a bit tart and acidic, with a strong tomato flavour to it, so a dry red wine is ideal. You can use the same red wines we listed above, and let’s add some more to that list.

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You can also use chianti and zinfandel to make spaghetti sauce. These will not give you an overly sweet spaghetti sauce and will help it to retain its acidic flavour.

No matter how you make your spaghetti sauce, you have to watch your proportions very carefully. That’s what makes a great spaghetti sauce and what also ruins a homemade spaghetti sauce. If you use too much or too little of any one ingredient, you can really mess up the final taste profile, resulting in a spaghetti sauce that is too dry, too acidic, or too heavy on a particular herb.

Spaghetti sauce is tricky to make, which is why I recommend you carefully follow a well-reviewed recipe at first. Then, once you become good at making it, you can change up some of the ingredients or proportions to make it more to your liking.

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How to Choose a Wine for Cooking

It’s not difficult to pick a decent wine for your meal. There is a simple rule of thumb that I follow and that I tell to anyone who asks me what is the best type of red wine for cooking.

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I tell them that they should just choose a wine that they like to drink. If you don’t like the flavour and its characteristics, then you probably won’t like it in your food. So, if you have a choice of wines to use in your dish, you may want to use one that you are familiar with and that you already know you will like.

Otherwise, you have just flavoured your dish with something that might not be to your liking.

The best red wine for cooking is usually a dry one. I err on the side of a dry rather than a sweet wine for anything that isn’t a dessert. You’re usually safe to add a little acidity to your meats and stir fry, but making the dish sweeter might not be such a good idea.

 

Written by Pauline

I'm Pauline, a mother of four grown children, my passion for cooking stemmed from the joy i get cooking for my family. I love to try new dishes, especially when dining out but creating and sharing my own recipes is my favourite thing to do!

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