5 Unusual Foods And How They Taste

What does sea urchin taste like? If you don’t know the answer, you’ve come to the right place! Trying different foods in different countries is an experience worth trying.

Take a look at Indian and Chinese cuisine, for example. Some dishes result from centuries of innovation and cooking. They passed through different generations until they reached perfection.

Who would say no to trying that?

Personally, I appreciate the wide variety of cultures and cuisines. If you appreciate it too, take a look at these five unusual foods.

Sea Urchin

Sea Urchin is a Japanese-born delicacy that has spikes surrounding its body. It lives in oceans between coral and rocks, thanks to its flexible round body that helps it move around. The Japanese dish is also called Uni, and it’s not only popular in Japan. A lot of chefs around the world feature it on their menus.

Despite their moderate size, sea urchins have small insides. The edible organs inside aren’t as big as they look.

Sea urchins must be eaten fresh if you want to taste the salty taste in all its glory. If you’re going to try it for the first time, you should look for a reputable restaurant.

What Does Sea Urchin Taste Like?

Sea urchins are the perfect balance of sweet and salty, with an elusive umami taste that’s not overwhelming. As seafood, the Uni tastes like the sea; it’s almost similar to the taste of oysters, except it’s much sweeter.

Along with the taste, sea urchins have a creamy texture that resembles that of butter.

Buttermilk

Buttermilk is a famous farm product that’s made from cream and fermented milk. It’s butter made of cream, which explains the naming. Back in the day, people used to make it at home and use it in baking because it helps the dough rise. Nowadays, most people buy it at stores, although both versions have drastically different tastes.

Store-bought buttermilk is skim milk that’s been infested with lactic bacteria to give it a tangy taste. Some manufacturers throw in butter to the recipe to give it a churned look, but the taste gives it away immediately.

Russian natives used to consume buttermilk for weight loss because of its low content of fat. They appreciated the fermented milk because its acidity keeps it preserved for a long time.

What Does Buttermilk Taste Like?

Buttermilk is originally fermented milk, which naturally means it has a sour taste. However, it’s not like that of sour cream; it’s more of a tangy taste that leaves a bitter aftertaste. Its acidity is high, which may be too much for some people.

Lutefisk

If you’re not Scandinavian, I doubt you’ll have any idea about this dish. Lutefisk is a tricky dish. It’s jellied fish, but it’s not among the jellyfish species we hear of. It’s regular white fish that’s been soaked, baked, and boiled. The result doesn’t resemble fish; it looks more like jelly.

While eating fish-flavoured jelly doesn’t sound appealing, it’s one of the most delicious seafood dishes. The Scandinavians mainly eat it over the Christmas season, and it’s said to have been invented by the Vikings.

What Does Lutefisk Taste Like

Lutefisk is white fish that’s been air-dried and rehydrated in a lye solution. Firstly, it soaks in cold water for five days, and then it’s soaked again for two days in lye. After soaking, it’s baked, boiled, and served. It loses half of its protein content during the process, giving it the jelly texture.

The fish is pretty tasteless, to be honest. The Scandinavians serve it alongside melted butter and roasted potatoes to give the dish a spicy taste. The fish tastes interesting, but it’s a mild taste, unlike that of powerful seafood dishes.

Bok Choy

The Chinese people love bok choy, and it’s no wonder why. The cabbage is highly versatile; it can be used in hundreds of dishes. You can consider bok choy a relative of broccoli and turnips, except that it originated in Asia.

In the US supermarkets, you’ll only find two types of bok choy: regular and Shanghai. Regular bok choy has dark green leaves, along with a bright white stalk. Meanwhile, Shanghai bok choy leaves are a bit oval, and they have a light green colour. The stalk is light green too.

What Does Bok Choy Taste Like?

Bok choy tastes like cabbage, obviously! However, the dark green leaves have a bitter taste that’s not there in regular cabbage. The stalk is full of water, giving it a juicy taste and a crunchy feel.
Bok choy taste can vary according to its harvesting.

If it’s harvested young, it’ll taste exactly like lettuce. The bitter taste develops later, giving mature bok choy its famous pronounced flavour.

Anchovies

A lot of people love anchovies nowadays, but not as much as the Romans did! They used the silverfish to create garum sold for a fortune, and only the finest people could get it. They treated the anchovies like the royalty of seafood, and it’s said that they were the reason it got that much popularity.

Anchovies have ‘umami,’ which is the last-discovered fifth taste. It gives food a tasting experience beyond sweet, sour, and bitter. People like to call it ‘savoury,’ but I believe the word doesn’t give it justice.

What Do Anchovies Taste Like?

Anchovies are known for their intense pungent taste. We have the high salt content to thank for that. If you’re not a fan of salty flavours, the anchovies aren’t for you.

The savoury taste will get your taste buds lingering for a while. You’ll want to balance the overwhelming flavour with something else to give them a break!

Final Thoughts

Now, you have a list that includes food from China, Roma, and the Scandinavian countries. The food-curious person inside you should be satisfied by now! Even if some foods on the list may sound weird, trying new cuisine is worth a shot.

Leave a comment and tell us which food sounds more interesting!

Follow Me
Pauline is a mother of four, when she isn't cooking up new dishes for her family and friends, she likes to dine out at newly-opened restaurants (especially tapas!) and review them in her blog posts.
Follow Me
Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




Share This